Boat should be stored "high and dry"

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Boat should be stored "high and dry"

Postby DanaDCole on Mon Jul 30, 2018 7:37 am

When I first built my PocketShip I debated putting anti-fouling paint on the hull so I could keep it on the water. Now I am glad I decided against it. On several occasions, I have discovered what I will call "stress fractures" on the bottom of the keel. These are small tears that follow the weave of the fiberglass fabric--in other words, the cloth has separated and possibly exposed bare wood. These tears are easy enough to repair, but if I left my boat on the water all the time (and didn't inspect the hull now and then), much greater damage might have ensued. Also, I suppose it is possible to suffer a gouge to the hull that exposes bare wood and goes unnoticed. A disaster waiting to happen.
This is another reason I am glad I replaced the bottom of the keel trough with rollers, otherwise I would not be able to see the bottom of the keel. And no, the rollers are not the cause of the fractures--the first one I noticed was near the aft end of the keel, beyond the keel trough that I had not yet replaced.
So, those of you who keep your boat on the water for long periods, I hope you have a way to haul it out and inspect the hull (and do so at least once a week). There have been too many horror stories on this site that were caused by water infiltration.
It is possible that trailering the boat is what causes extra stress to the keel. This is highly likely, but there is still that chance of damage while sailing that went unnoticed.
I welcome responses to this--if I am proved wrong or if you have a better solution I will be forever in your debt.
Oh, and one more thing--if your trailer has a keel trough and you can't see the bottom you need a way to lift the boat and inspect it. Here is one possible solution: https://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=98161
DanaDCole
 
Posts: 496
Joined: Wed Sep 25, 2013 2:06 pm
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma

Re: Boat should be stored "high and dry"

Postby Dave Archer on Tue Aug 21, 2018 12:35 am

I can confirm this. Precious little is now upside down in my garage for keel surgery. I encountered damage after a night at anchor when the wind came up and she bottomed on a sandy bed. The result was a smashed rudder and what I didn't realize at the time, a crack along the side of the keel where it joined the hull. The keel cavity filled with water and was undetectable. Only when I rolled her over did the water gush out! I've had to cut open and dry out the cavity. Not a small job. She is back together now and almost ready to paint. Beware the cracks!
Dave Archer
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2012 6:46 pm

Re: Boat should be stored "high and dry"

Postby DanaDCole on Tue Aug 21, 2018 6:45 am

Dave Archer,
Thanks for your reply and the information. I'm curious: How did you manage to get the boat off the trailer and roll it over? You must have had to remove everything from her cabin and you must have had a lot of help. And what about the tabernacle?* I think the lift I recommend in my post would have made things much easier. JD also sell a lift ($300 more) that stands on the ground and allows you to move the trailer out of the way. These two items, while not exactly cheap, could save people a lot of money and trouble in the long run. Also good when it comes time to re-paint the hull.
* This is one more reason I'm glad my tabernacle is bolted on--not glued. I can see no reason to glue it. If the shrouds are adjusted properly there is little or no lateral strain on the tabernacle. And if worse comes to worst, better to rip out a few bolts than your entire cabin front. Even when I (stupidly) ran my mast into an overhead power line, the tabernacle was damaged, but no damage to the cabin wall or mounts--proof that bolting it on is plenty strong.
DanaDCole
 
Posts: 496
Joined: Wed Sep 25, 2013 2:06 pm
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma

Re: Boat should be stored "high and dry"

Postby Dave Archer on Thu Aug 23, 2018 2:00 am

I got a few friends (8) around. We pushed her off onto the grass and rolled her over. I do have a bolt on tabernacle, (so glad I did this) so easy to strip down. I'm planning on a full fix up and paint as she is 5 years old now. My hatch cover is cracked up around the edges as it is a convenient place to stand, so some work required there.
Dave Archer
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2012 6:46 pm


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